Videgaray outlines Mexico’s negotiating posture with U.S.

Foreign Minister Videgaray testimony in the Senate 2/28 included several red lines and must-haves.

U.S. immigration law and enforcement

  • A strictly U.S. domestic issue, and Mexico will not get involved in an internal U.S. debate, BUT:
  • Mexico will not accept any non-Mexican deportees.
  • Mexico will protect the human rights of Mexicans in the U.S., and pursue any violations in international forums
  • There needs to be continued cooperation and coordination on border security matters; threats and insults need to cease
  • No militarization of the border
  • Mexicans leaving the U.S. (both voluntarily and involuntarily) must keep their rights to Social Security earned
  • U.S. and Mexico need to cooperate on Central America

NAFTA

We will not negotiate the Free Trade Agreement from the defendant’s dock.  Any negotiation between the parties must start from the premise that this has been an agreement that has generated important benefits for all three parties.

  • Mexico will undertake the trade negotiations, “without pause, but without haste”
  • No tariffs or quotas.
  • Negotiation should include mechanisms to support rising wages for Mexican workers, so the “production model” isn’t based on cheap labor.

The Wall

  • Construction of the wall is a hostile act, and Mexico will not collaborate in any way; but it is a sovereign matter for the U.S.
  • Mexico will pursue any violation of international law in international forums.

U.S. Tax regime

  • Mexico must be prepared to change its own tax regime if changes to US tax law affect Mexican interests or the economic competitiveness.

Drug trafficking / cartels

  • U.S. must assume its responsibility to reduce demand, and stop the flow of guns and money.

Remittances

  • No measures that restrict the flow of remittances or increase their cost.

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